Contact

If you’re interested in learning more about the Carbon Takeback policy, please get in touch using the form below.

Contact Details

Myles Allen

Professor Myles Allen studies climate at the University of Oxford. He first reported that achieving net zero emissions of carbon dioxide will be necessary to stop global warming in the mid-2000s, and has been working on the implications ever since.

myles.allen[AT]ouce.ox.ac.uk

Margriet Kuijper

Margriet Kuijper works as a consultant on CCS, CDR and climate policy. She worked for Shell for 30 years in climate change and CCS; and now leads a multi-stakeholder study investigating the potential of a CTBO policy in the Netherlands.

kuijpermargriet[AT]gmail.com

Patrick Dixon

Patrick Dixon is an independent advisor on CCS. He draws on his experience of working for BP, the UK nuclear decommissioning industry, and the UK CCS industry and BEIS to help investors and the UK government deliver real CCS projects.

Stuart Haszeldine

Stuart is a professor of carbon capture and storage at the University of Edinburgh and leader of the UK’s largest academic CCS research group. Stuart has over 30 years research experience in energy; innovating new approaches to oil and gas, radioactive waste, carbon capture and storage, and biochar. He has been working on CTBO since 2015, when achieving a discussion in the House of Lords Energy Bill, and is developing CCS deployment methods using geological storage, enhanced weathering, mineralisation, biomass, or Direct Air Capture

s.haszeldine[AT]ed.ac.uk

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Eli Mitchell-Larson

Eli Mitchell-Larson is a climate researcher and consultant focused on the technologies and policies necessary to achieve net zero (CCS, carbon removal, and carbon offsetting). He is experienced in renewables project finance and as an off-grid solar entrepreneur.

eli.mitchell-larson[AT]chch.ox.ac.uk

CarbonTakeback.org is an information resource supported by Oxford Net Zero and the ClimateWorks Foundation, although the views expressed herein are those of the site authors